Quick Answer: Where Do We Lay Our Scene?

Do with their death bury their parents?

Doth with their death bury their parents’ strife.

The which, if you with patient ears attend, …

For the next two hours, we will watch the story of their doomed love and their parents’ anger, which nothing but the children’s deaths could stop..

What here shall miss our toil meaning?

[13] The which, if you with patient ears attend, (G) [14] What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. ( G) This couplet has a simple meaning. It tells the audience that “If you pay attention to the play, everything will become clear.

Who said do you bite your thumb at us sir?

Romeo and JulietOriginal TextModern TextABRAM Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?ABRAM Are you biting your thumb at us?SAMPSON 40 (aside to GREGORY) Is the law of our side if I say “ay”?SAMPSON (aside to GREGORY) Is the law on our side if I say yes?GREGORY (aside to SAMPSON) No.GREGORY (aside to SAMPSON) No.11 more rows

What does two households both alike in dignity in fair Verona where we lay our scene?

In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.

How old is Juliet?

14A 14-year-old girl, Juliet is the only daughter of the patriarch of the House of Capulet. She falls in love with the main protagonist Romeo, a member of the House of Montague, with which the Capulets have a blood feud.

What does and the continuance of their parents rage?

It refers to the idea that nothing but the deaths of Romeo and Juliet will make their parents (and their families as a whole) stop hating each other. The first part of the quote refers to the “continuance” of the parents’ rage. This means that their hatred of each other would continue.

Which but their children’s end Nought could remove translation?

Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage; The which, if you with patient ears attend, What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

Why are the Montagues and Capulets fighting?

The beginning prologue only mentions that the feud between the Capulets and the Montagues stemmed from a grudge between the two families. In the opening of Act 1, we see that even the presence of a Capulet or a Montague can instantaneously start a fight because of the hatred they felt for each other.

How old was Romeo?

Shakespeare never gives Romeo a specific age. Although his age could be anywhere between 13–21, he is typically portrayed as being around the age of 16.

Where we lay our scene Meaning?

“Where we lay our scene” simply refers to the location where the story takes place, which as we’ve already discovered, is Verona. So the line can be translated into modern English as “In the beautiful city of Verona, where our story takes place.”

What does traffic mean in Romeo and Juliet?

stage, that in which our stage deals for two hours, the transaction with which our play is concerned. The duration of a play is frequently spoken of in the prologues to them as being of two hours only, though three hours is sometimes given. Back to Romeo and Juliet (1.1)

What does piteous mean in Romeo and Juliet?

piteous. deserving or inciting a feeling of sympathy and sorrow. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes. A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, Whose misadventured piteous overthrows.

What does piteous mean?

evoking or deserving pity; pathetic: piteous cries for help.

What does fatal loins mean in Romeo and Juliet?

Romeo and Juliet, Prologue: “From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life.” … This pun refers to the fatal blood lines of Romeo and Juliet – the families that they descended from are the reason for their death, as well as their ‘loins’ (their physical relationship).

Who said a pair of star crossed lovers take their life in Romeo and Juliet?

Definitions. The phrase was coined in the prologue of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life (5–6).

What does the prologue mean in Romeo and Juliet?

The Prologue refers to an ill-fated couple with its use of the word “star-crossed,” which means, literally, against the stars. … But the Prologue itself creates this sense of fate by providing the audience with the knowledge that Romeo and Juliet will die even before the play has begun.

Why do the Capulets and Montagues hate each other?

The Prologue merely refers to the feud between the Montagues and Capulets as an “ancient grudge” with no further explanation as to why the two families hate each other. … One of Shakespeare’s points is that the violence and feuding that ends with the death of Romeo and Juliet is senseless.