Question: Why Is There No Formal You In English?

What is formal situation?

We use formal language in situations that are serious or that involve people we don’t know well.

Informal language is more commonly used in situations that are more relaxed and involve people we know well.

There are also examples where spoken English can be very formal, for example, in a speech or a lecture..

Is Vosotros formal?

“Vosotros” is typically the formal use of the word “You all.” It’s the correct word to use when you’re talking about a group of adults or other respected individuals in the third person. “Ustedes” is a little trickier. It can be used in a formal and informal manner.

What is another word for thou?

In this page you can discover 13 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for thou, like: yourself, thee, you, m, k, chiliad, g, grand, yard, thyself and thousand.

How do you properly use thou?

Thou is used as a singular subject. Thee is used as a singular object. Thy is used as a possessive determiner and is used before words beginning with consonant sounds. Thine is used as a possessive determiner and is used before words beginning with a vowel sound.

What does hast mean in English?

(= you have)in the past, the second person singular form of the present tense of “have”: thou hast (= you have) Linguistics: verb forms, tenses & types of verbs.

What is Hast in modern English?

Hast is the original second-person singular present tense of to have and is now largely archaic, having been superseded by have. … It corresponds to the familiar second-person singular present tense of to have in some other European languages.

Does English have two forms of you?

Usage. In standard contemporary Modern English, you is both singular and plural; it always takes a verb form that originally marked the word as plural, (i.e. you are, in common with we are and they are). This was not always so. Early Modern English distinguished between the plural ye and the singular thou.

Is they first or second person?

First, second, and third person are ways of describing points of view. First person is the I/we perspective. Second person is the you perspective. Third person is the he/she/it/they perspective.

Why is there no plural you in English?

In middle English, there were informal terms for “you” singular (thou/thee) and informal “you” plural (ye/you). … It really isn’t a problem because context and verb endings will almost always make clear whether singular or plural is meant (there’s no grammatical need for a “y’all”).

What does hast thou mean?

Hast is an old-fashioned second person singular form of the verb ‘have. ‘ It is used with ‘thou’ which is an old-fashioned form of ‘you. ‘

Is ustedes formal?

Plural forms “Ustedes” is formal – used when speaking to a group of people you do not know well, or that you would individually refer to as “usted”. … “Ustedes” is used to refer to more than one person, regardless of whether you would use “tú” or “usted” with them individually.

What is thou thy thee mean?

Thou = you when the subject (“Thou liketh writing.”) Thee = you when the object (“Writing liketh thee.”) Thy = your possessive form of you. (“Thy blade well serves thee.”) Thine = your possessive form of you, typically used before a noun.

Is you was a correct grammar?

The correct grammatical term is “you were.” You were is correct. Was is the third person singular of the verb to be and is used with the pronouns he, she, it, or one.

Why did we stop using Thou?

The pronoun that had previously been restricted to addressing more than one person (ye or you) started to see service as a singular pronoun. … As a result, poor thou was downgraded, and was used primarily when referring to a person of lower social standing, such as a servant.

What is the formal version of you?

Yes. As far as I know, you actually is the formal, originally plural version (ye/you/your) and thou was the informal version (thou/thee/thy/thine).

Is Thou informal or formal?

Thee and Thou Were English’s Informal Pronouns Yup. You was formal, and thou was informal. In a book called The Personal Pronouns in the Germanic Languages, Stephen Howe says that in the fifteenth to sixteenth centuries, thou was generally used to address someone who was socially inferior or an intimate.

Why does thou mean?

(Entry 1 of 3) archaic. : the one addressed thou shalt have no other gods before me — Exodus 20:3 (King James Version) —used especially in ecclesiastical or literary language and by Friends as the universal form of address to one person — compare thee, thine, thy, ye, you.

Is thou still used?

The word thou /ðaʊ/ is a second-person singular pronoun in English. It is now largely archaic, having been replaced in most contexts by you. It is used in parts of Northern England and in Scots (/ðu/). … The use of the pronoun is also still present in poetry.

What say thou?

To succinctly clarify one aspect: Thou is a more familiar or informal way to say ‘you. ‘ Thee is the more formal way to say ‘you.

What does thou mean in Shakespeare?

Shakespeare’s Pronouns “Thou” for “you” (nominative, as in “Thou hast risen.”) “Thee” for “you” (objective, as in “I give this to thee.”) “Thy” for “your” (genitive, as in “Thy dagger floats before thee.”) “Thine” for “yours” (possessive, as in “What’s mine is thine.”)

Is yous a real word?

So youse (or yous) is simply a regular “add an ‘s’” plural, y’all is a contraction of the phrase you all, and yinz appears to be a contraction of you ones. In some places the phrasal you(s) guys is used, and in Kriol, an Aboriginal language of the Northern Territory, the plural yumob comes from you mob.